Questions For Mc Cain

1. One assumes that you, Senator Mc Cain, would agree that committing American forces in a war is the most serious decision and the most substantial test of judgment faced by any president.
2. The record suggests that even today you concur with the Bush-Cheney decision to go to war in Iraq.
3. One assumes that you agree that the reasons employed by the Administration to create support for the war were largely concocted lies vigorously sold as the truth, or premises founded on willful ignorance, sold equally vigorously.
4. Would you not agree that there are many countries around the world whose governments or policies we find distasteful, and, in some instances, murderous?
5. Would you be willing to accept the notion that one test to which the question of intervention must be subjected is whether or not we must lie in order to convince the nation that the enterprise is worthy?
6. As important as is the question of how our involvement in Iraq is terminated, can you not agree that a more fundamentally important qualification for the office of president is the judgment that distinguishes between an enterprise worthy of American blood and treasure, which you apparently still think Iraq was, and one that is not, into which category you have apparently placed all those other countries whose existence we have already agreed upon in this conversation?
7.  How would you now attempt to sell the war in Iraq to the American people without the lies of the speech at the University of Cincinnati, the State of the Union, Powell’s performance at the United Nations, and virtually every White House press conference in which the subject arose in the year 2002 and up until the first bombs exploded in Baghdad?
8.  Specifically, do you now disavow the conscious public tactic of the Administration, whose policies you have supported, to a) link Saddam Hussein to the attacks of 9/11, b) promote the idea that Iraq possessed WMD, in the face of the best American and British intelligence to the contrary, and c) the implementation of the plan, put forth by the Administration and carried out by US intelligence operatives, that involved the use of a knowingly false forged document in an effort to affect domestic political opinion, an act expressly forbidden by the laws that govern US intelligence agencies?
Questions for McCain
1. One assumes that you, Senator Mc Cain, would agree that the committing of American forces in a war is the most serious decision and the most substantial test of judgment faced by any president.
2. The record suggests that even today you concur with the Bush- Cheney decision to go to war in Iraq.
3. One assumes that you agree that the reasons employed by the administration to create support in the population for the endeavor were largely concocted lies vigorously sold as the truth, or premises founded on willful ignorance, sold equally vigorously.
4. Would you not agree that there are many countries around the world whose governments or policies we find distasteful, and, in some instances, murderous?
5. Would you be willing to accept the notion that one test to which the question of intervention must be subjected is whether or not we must lie in order to convince the nation that the enterprise is worthy?
6. As important as is the question of how our involvement in Iraq is terminated, can you not agree that a more fundamentally important qualification for the office of president is the judgment that distinguishes between an enterprise worthy of American blood and treasure, which you apparently still think Iraq was, and one that is not, into which category you have apparently placed all those other countries whose existence we have already agreed upon in this conversation?
7.  How would you now attempt to sell the war in Iraq to the American people without the lies of the speeches of the University of Cincinnati, the State of the Union, the United Nations, and virtually every White House press conference in which the subject arose in the year 2002 and up until the first bombs exploded in Baghdad?
8.  Specifically, do you now disavow the conscious public tactic of the Administration, whose policies you have supported, to a) link Saddam Hussein to the attacks of 9/11, and b) promote the idea that Iraq possessed W.M.D., in the face of the best American and British intelligence to the contrary, and c) the implementation of the plan, put forth by the Administration and carried out by US intelligence operatives, that involved the use of a knowingly false forged document in an effort to affect domestic political opinion, expressly forbidden by the laws that govern US intelligence agencies?
Questions for McCain
1. One assumes that you, Senator Mc Cain, would agree that the committing of American forces in a war is the most serious decision and the most substantial test of judgment faced by any president.
2. The record suggests that even today you concur with the Bush- Cheney decision to go to war in Iraq.
3. One assumes that you agree that the reasons employed by the administration to create support in the population for the endeavor were largely concocted lies vigorously sold as the truth, or premises founded on willful ignorance, sold equally vigorously.
4. Would you not agree that there are many countries around the world whose governments or policies we find distasteful, and, in some instances, murderous?
5. Would you be willing to accept the notion that one test to which the question of intervention must be subjected is whether or not we must lie in order to convince the nation that the enterprise is worthy?
6. As important as is the question of how our involvement in Iraq is terminated, can you not agree that a more fundamentally important qualification for the office of president is the judgment that distinguishes between an enterprise worthy of American blood and treasure, which you apparently still think Iraq was, and one that is not, into which category you have apparently placed all those other countries whose existence we have already agreed upon in this conversation?
7.  How would you now attempt to sell the war in Iraq to the American people without the lies of the speeches of the University of Cincinnati, the State of the Union, the United Nations, and virtually every White House press conference in which the subject arose in the year 2002 and up until the first bombs exploded in Baghdad?
8.  Specifically, do you now disavow the conscious public tactic of the Administration, whose policies you have supported, to a) link Saddam Hussein to the attacks of 9/11, and b) promote the idea that Iraq possessed W.M.D., in the face of the best American and British intelligence to the contrary, and c) the implementation of the plan, put forth by the Administration and carried out by US intelligence operatives, that involved the use of a knowingly false forged document in an effort to affect domestic political opinion, expressly forbidden by the laws that govern US intelligence agencies?.

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